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A Social Story to Prepare Children for Doctor's Appointments

In Behavior Strategies, Counselors, Parents, Social Stories by Rachel Wise3 Comments

Below you will find a social story about going to the doctor, to help children prepare for check-ups/appointments. Social stories are a research-based tool used to help children prepare for real-life events. They can help ease anxiety or set expectations for behavior in certain situations. Social stories are often used for children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD), anxiety disorders, or for …

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8 Major Principles of Positive Behavior Support

In Behavior Strategies, Behavior Support, Counselors, Educators, Parents by Rachel Wise

While in graduate school for education and school psychology, I learned about the principles of positive behavior support, a research-based practice. At the time, I was working in a group home with individuals with a variety of emotional and behavioral needs.  I knew this would be the perfect setting to implement my newly learned strategies. I immediately saw the positive …

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An Interactive Story about What School Is Like and How to Behave

In ADHD, Autism, Behavior Strategies, Behavior Support, Counselors, Fun Ideas, Parents, Social Stories by Rachel Wise

Below you will find an interactive social story about going to school. The story can be used to help children prepare for a typical school day including their first day of school. You can also read this story with your child to practice reading skills. Social stories are a research-based tool used to help children prepare for real-life events. They …

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How to Set Up the Classroom for Students with Autism and ADHD

In ADHD, Autism, Autism Spectrum, Behavior Strategies, Educational Strategies & Tips, Educators by Rachel Wise

This article gives a number of strategies that you can use in the classroom (or at home) to create a physical environment that helps meet the educational and behavioral needs of individuals with autism or ADHD. Very young children or children who have trouble understanding language would also benefit from some of these strategies. Every person is a unique individual, so in a group situation …

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17 Ways to Get Your Kids to Listen to You and Show You Respect

In Behavior Strategies, Behavior Support, Oppositional Defiant Disorder, Parents by Rachel Wise

This article gives you tips that teach you how to get your kids to listen to you, show you respect, and connect with you. Working as a residential counselor, behavior specialist, school psychologist, assistant teacher, tutor, mobile therapist, and babysitter, I have used all the strategies in this article with my own clients and students (except the ones that are more …

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12 Ways Schools Can Support Children on the Autism Spectrum

In Autism, Autism Spectrum, Behavior Strategies, Counselors, Educational Strategies & Tips, Educators, Parents by Rachel Wise

As a behavior specialist and school psychologist, I often hear parents of children on the autism spectrum asking what support schools can provide for their child. Children with autism often have an Individualized Education Program (IEP) in school to enable them to have specific goals, accommodations, and modifications; however, some parents may be unsure of what should actually be put in …

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How to Motivate Your Students and Get Them to Listen to You (39 Effective Strategies for Classroom Management)

In Behavior Strategies, Behavior Support, Educational Strategies & Tips, Educators by Rachel Wise

This article (and video presentation which you will find at the end) gives you 39 effective classroom management strategies to help you get your students motivated to complete their work and follow the classroom rules and expectations. These strategies may not be what you are used to and might require changes on your part. While there is no perfect method for eliminating …

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Printable Classroom Rules with Matching Visuals

In Autism, Behavior Strategies, Behavior Support, Counselors, Educational Strategies & Tips, Educators, Oppositional Defiant Disorder by Rachel Wise

See below for strategies and tips on implementing your classroom rules. Download [130.34 KB] Set Up Your RulesHaving rules/expectations for behavior in the classroom is a great way to encourage positive behavior if used correctly. For rules to be effective: keep them short and to the point, do not have too many rules (3 to 5 is a good rule …

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How to Talk to Kids to Improve Behavior

In Behavior Strategies, Behavior Support, Counselors, Parents, Social-Emotional by Rachel Wise

I can tell you from over 19 years of experience, that being calm, encouraging, positive, patient, and consistent far outweighs yelling, punishment, and threats in any situation with any child, regardless of what you believe has or hasn’t worked in the past. Research and experience show that positive parenting/teaching strategies win every time and why is that? Just like adults, kids …

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9 Practical Strategies to Decrease Impulsive Behaviors in Children

In ADHD, Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), Autism, Behavior Strategies, Counselors, Parents, Social Skills by Rachel Wise

Impulsive behaviors can make everyday situations challenging for your child and the people in his/her life. Impulsive behaviors are defined as actions that occur quickly and seem to happen without thinking or considering the consequences. Children diagnosed with ADHD often engage in impulsive behaviors, but impulsive behaviors do not necessarily indicate that a person has ADHD. Below Are Some Examples …

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Please Don’t Take Away My Recess-A Poem About ADHD

In ADHD, Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), Behavior Strategies, Counselors, Education and Behavior Poems, Educators, Parents by Rachel Wise

I got in trouble in school today. They took away my recess. They said it was because I couldn’t sit still, but I was feeling so restless. I couldn’t control my body. I wish they’d give me breaks to move. It’s so much easier to concentrate when I’m not forced to sit for an hour or two. Sometimes directions come …

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14 Strategies to Help Children with ADHD in the Classroom or at Home

In ADHD, Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), Behavior Strategies, Counselors, Educators, Parents by Rachel Wise

While this article discusses strategies for children with ADHD, many of these strategies can be utilized to help any child with challenging behaviors. Children diagnosed with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) or who have ADHD-like symptoms frequently have difficulty at school. They often get yelled at, lose recess time, get put in time out, get detention, or get a phone …

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10 Simple Ways to Improve Children’s Behavior (Home and School)

In Behavior Strategies, Behavior Support, Counselors, Educational Strategies & Tips, Educators, Parents by Rachel Wise

Parents and teachers often wonder how to discipline a child with behavior problems. Although some children truly have challenging behaviors regardless of what strategies we try, many children just need to have the adults in their lives make changes in the way they react, respond, or interact with them. This article gives 10 simple strategies that you can start implementing right …

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How to Use Natural and Logical Consequences to Improve Children’s Behavior

In Behavior Strategies, Behavior Support, Counselors, Educators, Oppositional Defiant Disorder, Parents by Rachel Wise

What are Natural Consequences?Natural consequences are consequences that occur naturally as the result of a behavior. For instance, if you were talking and being loud in the movie theater people might yell at you or tell you to be quiet (so other people can hear the movie). If you are hitting your friends, they probably won’t want to play with …

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25 Privileges You Can Let Your Child Earn for Good Behavior

In Behavior Strategies, Behavior Support, Parents by Rachel Wise

Preface: The method discussed in this article may not be necessary for all children. These are suggestions to help with a child who has difficulty following rules/expectations at home. And…this is one strategy. As you know, many strategies work together to lead to positive changes in behavior. At the end of this article, you will find suggestions for more articles to read …

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What Can You Do if Your Child is Having Persistent Problems in School? (Tips for Parents)

In ADHD, Autism, Behavior Strategies, Educational Strategies & Tips, Intellectual Disability, Learning Disabilities, Oppositional Defiant Disorder, Special Education by Rachel Wise

The contents in this article refer to public schools in the United States. If your child attends private school or school outside of the United States, speak to your child’s school to find out if their policies for addressing the matters discussed in this article are the same or different. When Would You Request an Evaluation by a School Psychologist? …

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Top Five Reasons for Behavior Problems in Kids

In Behavior Strategies, Behavior Support, Counselors, Educators, Oppositional Defiant Disorder, Parents by Rachel Wise

This article is meant to be helpful for any adult (teacher, parent, caregiver, etc.) who has a child with behavioral difficulties. Remember, there are no magic answers, and some kids may have challenging behavior no matter what strategies you use. However, most kids respond well to positive behavior strategies and these need to be your first step in trying to …

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